Soda & Powder: Any Differences?

The next step in my research is Baking Soda and Baking Powder. What are they? Are they important? Could one of them made my cookies fail?

My first search presented me with this webpage which has quite a bit of useful information. I will not repost all of it. Just the highlights.

“Both baking powder and baking soda are chemical leavening agents that cause batters to rise when baked.”

Ah-Ha! These are the products that cause the rise (or spread) of cookies and breads. Let’s read on and see if the recipe was flawed or if I goofed.

It says that it is imperative to mix the soda and powder with the dry ingredients of a recipe before adding the wet ingredients. This process helps to spread out the soda and powder evenly to help with the baking process. Since I did do that when I made the cookies, this was not the problem.

Here’s a paragraph that could be explanatory: “Baking soda, also known as sodium bicarbonate or bicarbonate of soda (alkali) is about four times as strong as baking powder.  It is used in recipes that contain an acidic ingredient (e.g. vinegar, citrus juice, sour cream, yogurt, buttermilk, chocolate, cocoa (not Dutch-processed), honey, molasses (also brown sugar), fruits and maple syrup). Baking soda starts to react and release carbon dioxide gas as soon as it is added to the batter and moistened. Make sure to bake the batter immediately.”

Ok, so when the recipe told me to keep the Baking Soda in the fridge overnight, it potentially killed the process the soda creates and allows the cookies to expand. This will require some investigating and by that I mean, make more cookies!

Should I continue on my teaching lesson on baking ingredients? What do y’all think? Next, I was going to do eggs and their importance.

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Categories: Basics of Cooking | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “Soda & Powder: Any Differences?

  1. Was about to say eggs too are a raising agent and baking powder can contradict that. Also we have self raising flour with the baking powder mixed.

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